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Week In Review

By Angela Peco Edited by Elissa D. Hecker

Below, for your browsing convenience, the categories are divided into: Entertainment, Arts, Sports, Media/Technology, and General News:


ENTERTAINMENT

Judge Rejects Harvey Weinstein Settlement Related to Numerous Civil Cases

A federal judge rejected Weinstein's $19 million settlement, questioning whether the women involved in the proposed agreement constituted a legal class given their varied experiences and interactions with Weinstein. One of the terms would pay out $12 million toward Weinstein's legal fees; the judge called the idea of Weinstein getting a defense fund ahead of the claimants "obnoxious."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/us/harvey-weinstein-settlement.html


Disney World Opens Its Gates Despite Surging Cases of the Coronavirus

The Florida resort reopened last week, likely facing considerable costs to provide employees with protective gear, set up hand-sanitizing stations, and install plexiglass partitions to prove it could operate safely. According to the New York Times, media coverage on opening day was tightly managed; a marketing video posted to Twitter became a target for criticism and parody and was removed by the company.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/11/business/florida-coronavirus-disney-world-reopening.html


University of Texas at Austin Will Not Drop Song with Racist History

The university announced that "The Eyes of Texas" will remain a campus anthem and that the school can "reclaim and redefine what this song stands for by first owning and acknowledging its history in a way that is open and transparent." The song was sung at minstrel shows and was inspired, in part, by the words of Confederate general Robert E. Lee. The school said that it would take action on other things, like rename a building named after a racist professor and commission a monument to its first Black undergraduates.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/us/eyes-of-texas-football.html


Hollywood Noticeably Silent on Facebook Advertising Boycott

The film industry is a big advertiser on Facebook but has been largely silent on the issue even as other industries (such as news media, banking, and travel) boycott Facebook over its handling of hate speech and other questionable content on its platform.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/15/business/media/hollywood-facebook-ad-boycott.htmlDisney


Billboard Changes Rules on How Bundled Ticket-and-Album Sales Count Toward Chart Placement

Artists who included their new albums as a redeemable bonus with purchase of concert tickets have typically had those numbers counted toward their Billboard chart placements. Billboard is now tweaking the rules that apply to these bundles, stating that if albums are sold with merchandise and concert tickets, the music must be promoted as an explicit add-on and needs to cost at least $3.49 to count on the chart. The policy will go into effect this fall.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/arts/music/billboard-ticket-merchandise-bundles.html


ARTS

Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Reviewing Staff Complaints of Racism

Signatories of a letter addressed to Smithsonian leadership expressed outrage that the National Museum of African Art "has recruited, retained and promoted a predominantly white staff" and accused leadership of turning a blind eye to the culture of racism there. Lonnie G. Bunch III, the first Black secretary of the Smithsonian said he is reviewing the complaints and that concerns about racism has informed his decision to appoint a Black administrator as interim director of the museum.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/15/arts/design/smithsonian-chief-racism-museum-of-african-art.html


Conflict of Interest at the Detroit Institute of Arts

A whistleblower complaint filed with the Internal Revenue Service and the Michigan attorney general says that the museum director violated conflict of interest rules that prevent self-dealing when he hung his in-laws' El Greco painting at the Detroit Institute of Arts. Employees say that the lack of transparency could financially benefit the director and his family, since exhibiting the painting could increase its value. The director says that he followed the museum's loan procedures, as approved by its board. Ethics experts say that if the work is ultimately sold, the loan would give rise to the appearance of impropriety, since the museum used its resources to enrich the official.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/15/arts/design/detroit-institute-art-el-greco.html


Marano v The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Southern District of New York dismissed on an order to show cause in the copyright suit brought by a photographer against the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The court held that the use of a photograph of Van Halen on the museum's website in connection with a rock music exhibition constituted fair use because it was being used in a scholarly context.

https://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/new-york/nysdce/1:2019cv08606/522915/17/


Mary Trump's Book Cleared for Publication

A New York judge ruled that the president's niece, Mary Trump, could go ahead with the publication of her tell-all memoir. The president's younger brother sought to stop the author and her publisher, Simon & Schuster, from releasing it, arguing that a confidentiality agreement signed by the author prohibited her from revealing family secrets. The judge ruled that the secrecy provision was narrow and only covered disagreements about the estate matters that were settled when the agreement was signed.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/us/politics/mary-trump-book.html


Publishing Industry in a Rare Moment of Transformation

A recent wave of deaths, retirements, and executive reshuffling has led to new and more diverse leadership in the publishing industry, which now has the opportunity to change its culture, recruit new authors and editorial talent, and diversify both its workforce and the titles it acquires.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/15/books/book-publishing-leadership.html


Opera Can No Longer Ignore its Race Problem

The article tracks recent discussions by Black opera singers about the issue of representation in the industry and about the opportunity to reform opera's culture as the industry rebuilds itself post-coronavirus closures.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/arts/music/opera-race-representation.html


Washington Town Takes Tough Stance on Chalk Drawings of "Black Lives Matter"

Selah, Washington residents have been warned by police that they would be charged with a crime for drawing chalk art on public sidewalks, with the city using pressure washers to remove the messages. There is a history of this type of action in Washington state, as officials rely on the "malicious mischief" law that prohibits writing on public buildings to press charges. However, a federal judge previously ruled that the law does not directly address public walkways.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/us/sidewalk-chalk-police-selah-washington.html


SPORTS

Yielding to Pressure from Corporate Sponsors, Washington Redskins Will Drop Team Name

Following its annual general meeting, the National Football League (NFL) team announced that it will be retiring the "Redskins" logo and name. The team has faced criticism for decades for retaining a name that has long been considered a racial slur. The decision came after pressure from major corporate sponsors, including FedEx, which threatened to end its naming rights sponsorship of the team's stadium.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/sports/football/washington-redskins-new-name.html


Sprawling Accusations of Sexual Harassment and Toxic Workplace Culture Against Washington NFL Team

More than a dozen women allege sexual harassment and verbal abuse by former executives and football personnel of the Washington Redskins. They allege that male executives commented on their appearances, sent them inappropriate text messages, and pursued unwanted relationships. They also say that the team's understaffed human resources department was incapable of proper oversight. Washington D.C.-based lawyer Beth Wilkinson has been hired by the team to conduct an "independent review of the team's culture, policies and allegations of workplace misconduct."

Diversity and inclusion advocates say that experiences of sexual harassment within NFL franchises will continue to be all too common if the league does not address its workplace culture and toxic relationship with women by installing mechanism to report harassment and abuse, as an example.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/sports/football/washington-sexual-assault-harassment-dan-snyder.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/17/sports/football/sexual-harassment-washington-dan-snyder.html


The Process of Rebranding for Professional Franchises

The article recounts the experience of other professional teams who have undertaken a rebranding process, including that of the National Basketball Associations's Washington Bullets in 1995, which owner rebranded the team voluntarily and independent of a new acquisition or relocation (it was done so out of concern for the gun violence that affected Washington communities at that time). The team solicited input from the public at two different junctures - it first ran a renaming contest that yielded 3,000 submissions; of those, five were selected and put to a public vote, but the decision ultimately rested with the team owner, Abe Pollin. Pollin's first choice, the Washington Monuments, was rejected because of trademark issues and the team landed on the Wizards. The article also notes that altering a team's identity has obvious implications for logos, trademarks, and merchandising, and points out that the NFL has a creative service division that helps teams with branding.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/sports/football/washington-name-change-trademark.html


Two Former NFL Players Sue the League and Union Over Cuts in Disability Payments

The players are challenging terms of the latest collective bargaining agreement *CBA), which reduced disability payments received by as many as 400 former players by tens of thousands of dollars a year. Starting in January 2021, the $138,000/year that the players currently receive will be reduced by the value of their Social Security disability benefits. The players contend that the language in the CBA was altered after it was signed, to the detriment of former players on disability.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/12/sports/football/nfl-union-disability-payments.html


Saquon Barkley Renegotiated Nike Deal Ahead of New Product Line

Right before launching his own apparel and footwear line, Giants running back Saquon Barkley renegotiated a four-year $25-million contract with Nike (the largest amount guaranteed to a player on a renegotiation while under contract). The terms reportedly include a 5% merchandise royalty rate, "twice the industry standard," ownership of all his created intellectual property, and more significantly, permission to work with another company to develop and wear an alternate branded product.

https://nypost.com/2020/07/14/saquon-barkley-entering-new-stratosphere-with-bar-raising-nike-line/


Women's National Basketball Association Denies Elena Delle Donne's Opt-out Request

Delle Donne's request for a medical exemption from playing in the 2020 season was denied by Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA) physicians. Donne's personal physician advised her not to play, citing increased risk of contracting and suffering complications from COVID-19. Her request was denied by a panel of doctors jointly selected by the WNBA and the players' union. The waiver would have allowed Donne to sit out the season with pay. In an essay for The Players' Tribune, the WNBA star wrote about the lengths she has gone through to keep herself healthy as she battles Lyme disease.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/sports/basketball/wnba-delle-donnes-opt-out.html


Major League Soccer Delaying Timelines for Several Expansion Franchises Due to COVID-19

Major League Soccer (MLS0 is postponing the inaugural seasons of three expansion clubs due to the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on stadium construction and business operations. Austin FC will enter MLS in 2021, as originally planned, but Charlotte will now enter the league in 2022 instead of 2021. Sacramento and St. Louis' entries are also being pushed back to 2023.

https://ca.reuters.com/article/sportsNews/idCAKCN24I2Q5-OCASP


Female Athletes and Parenting in the Bubble

Certain leagues, including professional soccer, have taken steps to make it easier on female athletes to take care of their children while living in so-called bubble environments now that some sports have resumed play. Some women's leagues have arranged for caregivers at their sites and put in place special testing protocols for young children. It is a stark contract to the world of men's professional sports, where children and families are not allowed, partly due to concerns over the size of the operation and its costs - but also a reflection of societal values treating child-rearing as a woman's responsibility.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/sports/soccer/parenting-bubble-nwsl-wnba.html


Arkansas Racing Commission Suspend Trainer After 15 Horses Test Positive for Banned Substance

Trainer Bob Baffert was suspended for 15 days and two of his horses were disqualified from races they won after testing positive for lidocaine. The rules state that a trainer is ultimately responsible for the condition of the horse regardless of any third party involvement.

https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2020/07/15/sports/15reuters-horseracing-baffert.html


National Collegiate Athletic Association Announces Testing Guidelines

While the prospect of a fall sports season looks grim, the recommendations were issued in an effort to add uniformity to virus testing protocols and response procedures. They were developed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA's) COVID-19 Advisory Panel and a number of other medical groups, and consist of the following requirements: individuals with high-risk exposure must be quarantined for 14 days; test results should be obtained within 72 hours of competition for athletes in high-contact sports; face shields should be integrated when feasible; and marks should be worn by everyone on the sideline.

https://apnews.com/e4c96a051977a47ae052dee7067be652


Canadian Football League Team to Change Name from Eskimos

The Edmonton Eskimos announced that the team will be changing its name. Canadian Football League sponsors had recently expressed a desire to see such a change. Insurance company Bel Air Direct had threatened to drop its sponsorship if a name change did not occur.

https://www.tsn.ca/edmonton-cfl-franchise-to-drop-eskimos-name-1.1496402


Toronto Blue Jays Denied Federal Government Approval to Play Home Games in Toronto

The federal government cited health and safety of Canadians in denying Major League Baseball (MLB) a cross-border travel exemption. Municipal and provincial health authorities had previously approved the Jays' return to Toronto for preseason training, as long as staff remained isolated within the Rogers Center and adjacent facilities. The federal government distinguished regular season games, which would require repeated cross-border travel of players and staff, as well as opponent teams in and out of Canada. The team is said to be in the process of finalizing a home location for the 2020 season, which could be Buffalo or its training facility in Dunedin, Florida.

https://www.nbcsports.com/washington/nationals/toronto-blue-jays-denied-approval-play-toronto-amid-coronavirus-pandemic


International Olympic Committee President Confirms Run for Re-Election

International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Thomas Bach, who began his tenure in 2013, will seek re-election next year. If re-elected, IOC rules will limit him to a second eight-year term. The Beijing Winter Olympics scheduled for February 2022 will be a potential test of Bach's second term, as China's human rights record is an expected target ahead of those Games. Bach recently warned against Olympic boycotts, saying that they only punish the athletes of the boycotting country.

https://apnews.com/1e1d2d5ed2e0d086bf358e871c4c063c


World Surf League Cancels 2020 Season

The sport's governing body has cancelled the 2020 World Championship Tour this year and is planning an early start to the 2021 tour in case the pandemic continues to cause scheduling changes going forward.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/17/sports/world-surf-league-cancels-2020-season.html


MEDIA/TECHNOLOGY

Prominent Twitter Users Hacked in Bitcoin Scam, and the Hackers Tell the Story of the Twitter Attack from the Inside

High-profile Twitter users had their accounts hacked lacked week. The hackers posted similar messages on Twitter, asking users to send Bitcoin and promised that the famous people would send back double their money. The scam targeted the accounts of Joe Biden, Barack Obama, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and Bill Gates, among others. Twitter's investigation revealed that several of its employees with access to internal systems had their accounts compromised. The hackers then used the internal systems to tweet from the accounts.


Although the investigation is still in its early stages, the New York Times reports that four young hackers were behind the security breach after being put in touch with them by a security researcher in California and seeing corroborating evidence of their involvement.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/15/technology/twitter-hack-bill-gates-elon-musk.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/17/technology/twitter-hackers-interview.html


ESPN Employees Say Racism Endures Behind the Camera

The nationwide conversation over systemic racism and equality has not spared ESPN. In recent meetings with leadership, Black employees have been speaking out about the everyday racism and barriers that undermine career advancement at ESPN. Despite the company acknowledging hiring shortfalls and changing its approach to covering racial unrest among athletes, "employees expressed mixed opinions about the prospect for change."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/sports/espn-racism-black-employees.html


ViacomCBS Fires Nick Cannon, Citing Anti-Semitic Podcast Remarks

The network said that Cannon had promoted hateful speech on an episode of Cannon's Class, his YouTube podcast, in which he discussed conspiracy theories about Jewish people and said it was a shame that Louis Farrakhan, a minister known for his anti-Semitic comments, had been silenced on Facebook.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/15/arts/television/nick-cannon-fired.html


USA Today Says Op-Ed Critical of Anthony Fauci Fell Short of Standards

The editorial page editor of USA Today wrote that aspects of White House trade advisor Peter Navarro's article, in which he criticized Anthony Fauci as "being wrong on everything," "were misleading or lacked context" and did not meet the paper's fact-checking standards. In the article, Navarro was critical of Fauci's stance on masks and his position on the risks of the coronavirus.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/business/media/usa-today-peter-navarro-fauci.html


Chatham Hedge Fund Has Winning Bid for Newspaper Publisher McClatchy

Newspaper publisher McClatchy Company announced that it expects to be bought by hedge fund Chatham Asset Management, the owner of The National Enquirer, following a bankruptcy sale. The sale marks the end of 163 years of family ownership and shows the growing influence of the finance industry on American newspapers.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/12/business/media/hedge-fund-mcclatchy-newspapers.html


New York Times Will Move Part of Hong Kong Office to Seoul

The move comes after a sweeping national security law passed by China "unsettled news organizations and created uncertainty about the city's prospects as a hub for journalism in Asia." Some employees have had difficulties securing work permits and the paper felt that it needed an additional base of operations in the region.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/business/media/new-york-times-hong-kong.html


European Union Court Nullifies U.S. Data-Sharing Agreement

The Court of Justice of the European Union (EU) declared the Privacy Shield agreement between the U.S. and EU invalid over concerns with U.S. surveillance laws and consumer data access for national security reasons. The decision could require EU regulators to vet businesses' data transfers to the U.S. to ensure that Europeans' personal information is protected in accordance with EU standards.

https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2020/07/16/business/bc-eu-europe-data-privacy-facebook.html?searchResultPosition=9


Britain's BBC Announces More Job Cuts

British broadcaster BBC announced it will cut 520 jobs in its news operation, 70 more than originally announced.

https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2020/07/15/business/15reuters-britain-bbc-jobs.html


United Kingdom Bans Huawei from 5G Network

The United Kingdom (UK) banned the use of the Chinese tech giant's equipment in its high-speed wireless network, reversing an earlier decision that said it could use the equipment only on a limited basis. The UK seems to share the concern of other western states that Huawei's close ties to the Chinese government make its equipment vulnerable for state use and espionage.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/business/huawei-uk-5g.html


General News

Supreme Court Allows Florida to Limit Voting by Former Felons

The decision permits Florida to bar people with felony convictions from voting if they have not paid court fines and fees. The dissenting judges said that the order "continues a trend of condoning disenfranchisement" by preventing "eligible voters from participating in Florida's primary election simply because they are poor." The state's Constitution, amended in 2018, ended disenfranchisement of people convicted of felonies (with the exception of murder and rape), "upon completion of all terms of sentence, including parole or probation." The legislature subsequently enacted a law that defined these "terms" to include payment of fines, restitution, costs, and fees.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/16/us/supreme-court-felons-voting-florida.html


Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Says Her Cancer Has Returned

Justice Ginsburg said that she is once again receiving chemotherapy but has no plans to retire from the Supreme Court and remains fully able to "do the job full steam." Justice Ginsburg recently underwent a gallbladder procedure and participated in oral arguments from the hospital.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/17/us/justice-ruth-bader-ginsburg-cancer.html


17 States Sue Federal Government Over Student Visa Rules; Government Rescinds Plan

Seventeen states and the District of Columbia joined some of America's top universities in challenging the Trump administration's effort to force foreign college students to take in-person classes or lose their visas. Earlier this year, the government allowed foreign students to take more online classes and the universities argued that as the state of emergency remains in effect, so too should the waived visa rules. Following broad pushback, the administration then announced that it would no longer require foreign students to attend in-person classes during the pandemic in order to remain in the country.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/14/us/coronavirus-international-foreign-student-visas.html

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/13/us/f1-student-visas-trump.html


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