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Week In Review

By Chantelle A. Gyamfi Edited by Elissa D. Hecker


Below, for your browsing convenience, the categories are divided into: Entertainment, Arts, Sports, Media/Technology, and General News:


ENTERTAINMENT

CBS Fires Producer of 'Magnum P.I.' After Workplace Complaints

CBS announced that it had fired Peter M. Lenkov, one of its most prolific producers, after a human resources investigation concluded that he had created a toxic workplace environment on his shows. Lenkov was an executive producer on three CBS prime-time dramas, all of them reboots of earlier programs centered on law enforcement: "Hawaii 5-O," which appeared on the network from 2010 until its recent finale; "MacGyver," which was renewed for a fifth season; and "Magnum P.I.," which is headed for a third season. "Peter Lenkov is no longer the executive producer overseeing 'MacGyver' and 'Magnum P.I.,' and the studio has ended its relationship with him," CBS Television Studios said in a statement. In a statement of his own, Lenkov said: "Now is the time to listen, and I am listening. It's difficult to hear that the working environment I ran was not the working environment my colleagues deserved, and for that, I am deeply sorry."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/business/media/peter-lenkov-fired.html?searchResultPosition=1


Actors' Union Approves Berkshire Shows

For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic erupted, Actors' Equity is agreeing to allow a few of its members to perform onstage. The union, which represents 51,000 actors and stage managers around the country, said that it had given the green light to two summer shows in the Berkshires region of Western Massachusetts: an outdoor production of the musical "Godspell" and an indoor production of the solo show "Harry Clarke." In recent weeks, multiple theaters featuring nonunion actors have begun resuming performances -- in some cases outdoors, and in almost all cases with social distancing -- and a group of Equity actors collectively developed an outdoor performance piece in the Hudson Valley. Many actors have also been performing online. "Godspell" and "Harry Clarke," both scheduled to begin in early August in Pittsfield, Mass., are now likely to be the first productions in which union actors will perform in person for paying audiences in the United States since the threat of infection prompted Broadway and the nation's regional theaters to shut down in mid-March. Citing safety concerns, Equity had barred its members from in-person auditions, rehearsals, and performances.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/theater/actors-equity-theater-reopening.html?searchResultPosition=1


Theater Artists of Color Enumerate Demands for Change

A coalition of theater artists, known by the title of its first statement, "We See You, White American Theater," has posted online a 29-page set of demands that, if adopted, would amount to a sweeping restructuring of the theater ecosystem in America. The coalition, made up of Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) theatermakers, has declined to make anyone available to answer questions, and says on its website that it has no leadership or spokesperson. "We understand the desire for individual interviews, but this is a collective movement and it would not be appropriate for any of us to speak on behalf of the all," the group said in response to an email inquiry. The group's initial statement was signed by more than 300 artists and then endorsed by thousands online; among its more visible supporters are the playwrights Lynn Nottage and Dominique Morisseau, who called attention to the list of demands online.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/10/theater/we-see-you-theater-demands.html?searchResultPosition=1


Disney World Stokes a Political Firestorm

Walt Disney World in Orlando, Fla. reopened, and Disney has been posting marketing videos online to highlight the safety procedures it has designed to protect visitors and employees. Some of the 1,000-plus responses to that particular video were supportive. Others were incredulous, with people using words like "irresponsible" and "disappointing." Disney World is reopening? When coronavirus infections have soared in Florida? "Stay. Closed. Please," one person wrote. The pandemic has devastated Disney's businesses, and reopening its signature tourist attraction -- with restricted capacity and government approval -- is a major part of the company's comeback attempt. However, in doing so, Disney is stepping into a politicized debate surrounding the virus and efforts to keep people safe, where even the wearing of masks has become a point of bitter contention.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/business/coronavirus-disney-world-reopening.html?searchResultPosition=1


An Ailing Film Industry

Italy's torrid summers have made outdoor movie showings under the stars a favorite entertainment choice of the season. Even the first Venice Film Festival, in August 1932, was held on the terrace of the Hotel Excelsior at the Lido, the island just off the center of Venice. This year though, several nonprofit cultural and social organizations have struggled to get their summer film festivals going after film distributors refused to rent them many requested titles, from the Harry Potter series to "BlacKkKlansman" and "Bohemian Rhapsody." The reason? These nonprofit organizations screen films for free, even as Italy's fabled film industry is reeling with many theaters closed because of the coronavirus. Normally the Milan open air initiative screens 10 films during the summer. This year, it will show only four, after five distributors for Universal, Warner Bros., Disney, 20th Century Fox, and RAI Cinema refused to issue rights to films that Sansone's organization had chosen with input from local residents, he said. "The distributors told us that if we show them for free, they can't give us films," he said. Yet those in the business say that the pandemic dealt such a blow that it put the survival of Italy's film industry at risk, and that giving unfettered free access to films would only make matters worse.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/05/world/europe/coronavirus-italy-outdoor-movies-festivals.html?searchResultPosition=1


ARTS

Museums in the Berkshires Plan to Reopen

Three major cultural institutions in the Berkshires will reopen this month, following the greenlight from Charlie Baker, the governor of Massachusetts, who said on Thursday that the state would move into Phase 3 of its reopening plans. In a joint statement, Mass MoCA, the Norman Rockwell Museum, and the Clark Art Institute outlined the programming changes and social-distancing measures they will be taking to ensure that visitors can return to the museums safely. Mass MoCA, which has performing arts venues, reopened on July 11th, and plans to resume some smaller performances starting July 18th. The galleries at the Norman Rockwell Museum and the Clark Art Institute both reopened on July 12th. Each museum requires advance ticketing reservations for staggered entry, and visitors are required to wear face coverings indoors. The institutions are also planning to use visitor information gathered at ticketing for contact-tracing purposes.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/02/arts/design/berkshires-museums-reopening-virus.html?searchResultPosition=1


Students' Calls to Remove a Mural Were Answered. Now Comes a Lawsuit.

For years, there has been a simmering debate over what to do with a New Deal-era mural at the University of Kentucky that students have denounced as a racist sanitizing of history and a painful reminder of slavery in a public setting. The wall-length mural, a 1934 fresco by Ann Rice O'Hanlon, is covered with vignettes that are intended to illustrate Kentucky's history. At the center of the mural is an image of enslaved people tending to tobacco plants, and at the bottom, there is a Native American man holding a tomahawk and peering out from behind a tree at a white woman as if poised for attack. Since 2015, university administrators have tried to find a resolution that doesn't involve removing the mural. Last month, as many predominantly white institutions in the United States were being forced to answer for their history of racism in the wake of George Floyd's killing, the University of Kentucky, in Lexington, decided that it was time for the mural to be removed. Now, Wendell Berry -- the writer, farmer, and longtime Kentuckian -- is suing the university over its decision to remove the mural, arguing that because it was created through a government program, it is owned by the people of Kentucky and cannot be removed by the university.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/arts/design/university-of-kentucky-slavery-mural-lawsuit.html?searchResultPosition=1


Artists + Scholars Warn

The killing of George Floyd has brought an intense moment of racial reckoning in the United States. As protests spread across the country, they have been accompanied by open letters calling for -- and promising -- change at white-dominated institutions across the arts and academia. Last week, a different type of letter appeared online. Titled "A Letter on Justice and Open Debate," and signed by 153 prominent artists and intellectuals, it began with an acknowledgment of "powerful protests for racial and social justice" before pivoting to a warning against an "intolerant climate" engulfing the culture. "The free exchange of information and ideas, the lifeblood of a liberal society, is daily becoming more constricted," the letter declared, citing "an intolerance of opposing views, a vogue for public shaming and ostracism and the tendency to dissolve complex policy issues in a blinding moral certainty." "We refuse any false choice between justice and freedom, which cannot exist without each other," it continues. "As writers we need a culture that leaves us room for experimentation, risk taking, and even mistakes." The letter, which was published by Harper's Magazine and will also appear in several leading international publications, surfaces a debate that has been going on privately in newsrooms, universities, and publishing houses that have been navigating demands for diversity and inclusion, while also asking which demands -- and the social media dynamics that propel them -- go too far.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/arts/harpers-letter.html?searchResultPosition=1


Brooks Brothers Files for Bankruptcy

Brooks Brothers, the retailer known for dressing the great and good of the United States since 1818, filed for bankruptcy, buckling under the pressure from the coronavirus pandemic after years of faltering sales as customers embraced more casual apparel and sales shifted online. The company, founded and based in New York, filed for Chapter 11 restructuring proceedings in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Delaware. Claudio Del Vecchio, the Italian industrialist who bought the brand in 2001 and still owns the company, told The New York Times in May that he would not rule out Chapter 11 as a possibility. Brooks Brothers said in an emailed statement that the filing would allow it to obtain additional financing as it facilitated a sale. The bankruptcy is the latest high-profile retail fall during the pandemic, which has caused widespread store closures and sales declines, reshaping the shopping streets of cities across the country. Since May, major names like J.C. Penney, Neiman Marcus and J.Crew have all been pushed into Chapter 11 proceedings. The chains, including Brooks Brothers, plan to keep operating, though most likely in a pared-back fashion.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/business/brooks-brothers-chapter-11-bankruptcy.html?searchResultPosition=2 https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2020/07/08/business/bc-brooks-brothers-bankruptcy.html?searchResultPosition=3


Graffiti Is Back in Virus-Worn New York

While most New Yorkers grudgingly accepted New York City's lockdown in March, one community eagerly embraced it: graffiti writers. Deserted commercial streets with gated storefronts offered thousands of blank canvases for quick tags or two-tone throwies, while decorative murals in gentrifying neighborhoods were sprayed over as the streets rendered a definitive critique. From the South Bronx to East New York, a new generation of graffiti writers has emerged, many of whom have never hit a trainyard or the inside of a subway car. Like early taggers who grew up in a city beset by crime, grime and empty coffers, today's generation is dealing with its own intense fears over the devastating effects of the coronavirus on communities and the economy. While graffiti never disappeared completely, in recent weeks it has become ever more visible citywide. The increase in graffiti is for many residents an unwelcome sign of the recent economic upheaval, especially for property owners who take on the Sisyphean task of trying to erase it all.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/nyregion/graffiti-nyc.html?searchResultPosition=5


U.K. Announces $2 Billion Bailout to Help Keep the Arts Afloat

Britain's arts sector, largely shuttered since March because of the pandemic and warning of an imminent collapse, is being given a lifeline through what Prime Minister Boris Johnson described as a "world-leading" rescue package for cultural and heritage institutions. The organizations will be handed £1.57 billion (about $2 billion). Johnson said in a statement that the money would "help safeguard the sector for future generations, ensuring art groups and venues across the U.K. can stay afloat and support their staff whilst their doors remain closed and curtains remain down." The money will go to a variety of recipients, including Britain's "local basement" music venues and museums, he added, although he did not provide details. Museums in England were allowed to reopen, but it is unclear when theaters and music venues will be permitted to do so as well.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/arts/uk-rescue-package.html?searchResultPosition=1


Court Ruling in Monaco Ends One Piece of a $2 Billion Art Dispute

A long-running dispute between Yves Bouvier, a Swiss businessman who sold $2 billion worth of artworks, and Dmitry Rybolovlev, the Russian billionaire who bought them, took a decisive step in Bouvier's favor when a Monaco court upheld a lower court's ruling to dismiss the criminal investigation against him because the prosecution of him had been unfair. The ruling ends the criminal procedures in Monaco against Bouvier, who was arrested following a criminal complaint by Rybolovlev in early 2015. "It is a total and definitive victory in Monaco," Bouvier said in a statement. "For the last five years, I have been claiming my innocence, and today I have been vindicated by the Monaco courts." The messy battle began several years ago when Bouvier helped Rybolovlev buy 38 pieces of world-class art for $2 billion over a period of about 12 years, including works such as "Salvator Mundi," a depiction of Christ attributed to Leonardo da Vinci. Rybolovlev has said in court papers that he believed that Bouvier was acting as his agent and adviser on the transactions, and he paid Bouvier a fee for his services. He then later discovered, he said, that Bouvier had bought many of the items in advance, then flipped them to him at a markup of $1 billion.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/arts/design/yves-bouvier-art-fraud-monaco.html?searchResultPosition=1


Turkey Destroys Ancient Treasure

There was something exceptional about Hasankeyf that made visitors fall in love with the town on first sight. Graced with mosques and shrines, it lay nestled beneath great sandstone cliffs on the banks of the River Tigris. Gardens were filled with figs and pomegranates, and vine-covered teahouses hung over the water. The golden cliffs, honeycombed with caves, are thought to have been used in Neolithic times. An ancient fortress marked what was once the edge of the Roman Empire. The ruins of a medieval bridge recalled when the town was a wealthy trading center on the Silk Road. Now it is all lost forever, submerged beneath the rising waters of the Ilisu Dam, the latest of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's megaprojects, which flooded 100 miles of the upper Tigris River and its tributaries, including the once-stunning valley.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/05/world/middleeast/turkey-erdogan-hasankeyf-Ilisu-dam.html?searchResultPosition=1


Hagia Sophia to Be Used as a Mosque Again

Since it was built in the sixth century, changing hands from empire to empire, Hagia Sophia has been a Byzantine cathedral, a mosque under the Ottomans, and finally a museum, making it one of the world's most potent symbols of Christian-Muslim rivalry and of Turkey's more recent devotion to secularism.


President Recep Tayyip Erdogan issued a decree ordering Hagia Sophia to be opened for Muslim prayers, an action likely to provoke international furor around a World Heritage Site cherished by Christians and Muslims alike for its religious significance, for its stunning structure and as a symbol of conquest. The presidential decree came minutes after a Turkish court announced that it had revoked Hagia Sophia's status as a museum, which for the last 80 years had made it a monument of relative harmony and a symbol of the secularism that was part of the foundation of the modern Turkish state.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/world/europe/erdogan-hagia-sophia-mosque.html?searchResultPosition=1

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/10/world/europe/hagia-sophia-erdogan.html?searchResultPosition=2

https://www.nytimes.com/video/world/100000007233558/hagia-sophia-erdogan-mosque.html?searchResultPosition=1


SPORTS

Kaepernick Signs Production Deal with Disney

Colin Kaepernick and the Walt Disney Company announced a production deal that will see the activist quarterback produce "scripted and unscripted stories that explore race, social injustice and the quest for equity" for the media giant's various platforms, including ESPN. Work has already begun on a documentary series that will explore the last five years of Kaepernick's life, as he began kneeling during the playing of the national anthem before National Football League (NFL) games to protest racism and police brutality, and later accused team owners of colluding to keep him out of the league. It is a first-look deal, meaning Disney has the right of first refusal over projects from Ra Vision Media, Kaepernick's company. The deal is just one of many Kaepernick has signed in the last year to produce media about himself and the topics he cares about, even as he has remained silent publicly.

https://www.nytimes.com/reuters/2020/07/06/sports/football/06reuters-people-kaepernick-espn.html?searchResultPosition=1 https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/sports/football/colin-kaepernick-disney-jemele-hill-espn.html?searchResultPosition=2


Delayed Testing and Instant Anger as Major League Baseball Struggles to Resume

Major League Baseball (MLB) triumphantly declared morning that it would announce a 60-game schedule on its cable network that evening. Around the same time, the two teams from last year's World Series, the Washington Nationals and the Houston Astros, were canceling their Monday workouts for safety reasons -- and blaming MLB. The reason for the holdup was a delay in receiving the results of the coronavirus tests taken by players from both teams. The Oakland Athletics' tests, too, had not even been delivered to the MLB laboratory in Utah. The St. Louis Cardinals also canceled their workout because of the testing delay. The players will be tested, as planned, every other day through the end of the World Series, and bad news has already been pouring in. Atlanta's Freddie Freeman, Colorado's Charlie Blackmon, Kansas City's Salvador Perez, San Diego's Tommy Pham, Texas' Joey Gallo, and the Yankees' D.J. LeMahieu are among the many players who have tested positive for the coronavirus.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/sports/baseball/mlb-testing-coronavirus.html?searchResultPosition=2


The Demand Snyder Couldn't Afford to Dismiss

After decades of controversy, it took a serious threat to Dan Snyder's team's finances, and those of the rest of the NFL, to get the owner of the Washington Redskins to consider changing the team's name, which Native Americans (and many dictionaries) consider to be a slur. The final straw? FedEx, which pays about $8 million a year for the naming rights to the team's stadium in Landover, Md., and whose chairman has been trying to sell his shares in the team, said that it would back out of the deal if the name was not changed in a letter that The New York Times was allowed to review. On July 2nd, the legal counsel for FedEx sent a letter to his counterpart with the team, saying that the company would demand its name be removed from the stadium, where it has been displayed since 1999, if the team name was not changed. "We are hopeful that a name change and a new head coach will help move public perception in a positive direction, restore the team's reputation and lessen our deep concerns," the letter said. A day later, Snyder said that the team "will undergo a thorough review" of its name, bending to a company that committed to paying more than $200 million for its affiliation with the team.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/10/sports/football/dan-snyder-washington-redskins-name-fedex.html?searchResultPosition=1


Trump Supports "Redskins" Name as Team Considers Changing It

The battle over the name of the Washington, D.C., NFL team deepened as Trump defended it even as more retailers said they would pull the team's gear off their shelves. "They name teams out of STRENGTH, not weakness, but now the Washington Redskins & Cleveland Indians, two fabled sports franchises, look like they are going to be changing their names in order to be politically correct," Trump said on Twitter, adding a reference to the MLB team that is also considering changing its name. Trump's statement came as Walmart and Target, two of the country's largest retailers, said that they would stop selling Washington's merchandise on their websites. Target is in the process of removing it from its stores as well, according to a company spokesman.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/sports/football/washington-team-name-change.html?searchResultPosition=1


Ivy League Suspends Sports for The Fall

The Ivy League became the first Division I conference to suspend all fall sports, including football, leaving open the possibility of moving some seasons to the spring if the coronavirus pandemic is better controlled by then. "We simply do not believe we can create and maintain an environment for intercollegiate athletic competition that meets our requirements for safety and acceptable levels of risk," the Ivy League Council of Presidents said in a statement. "We are entrusted to create and maintain an educational environment that is guided by health and safety considerations. There can be no greater responsibility -- and that is the basis for this difficult decision." Though the coalition of eight academically elite schools does not grant athletic scholarships or compete for an NCAA football championship, the move could have ripple effects throughout the big business of college sports.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/sports/ncaafootball/ivy-league-fall-sports-football-coronavirus.html?searchResultPosition=1 https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2020/07/08/sports/ap-virus-outbreak-college-sports.html?searchResultPosition=2


Stanford Drops 11 Sports to Cut Costs

Stanford was already facing some difficult financial choices as it tried to support one of the nation's largest athletics departments. The coronavirus pandemic forced a dramatic and painful decision: Faced with a nearly $25 million deficit next year, Stanford became the first known Power Five school to eliminate athletic programs because of the pandemic, announcing hat 11 of its 36 varsity sports will be shuttered next year. The school will discontinue men's and women's fencing, field hockey, lightweight rowing, men's rowing, co-ed and women's sailing, squash, synchronized swimming, men's volleyball, and wrestling after the 2020-21 academic year. Stanford also is eliminating 20 support staff positions.

https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2020/07/08/sports/ap-us-virus-outbreak-stanford-cuts.html?searchResultPosition=2


Womens National Basketball Association Players Say Stop Owner

The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) announced that its upcoming season would be "dedicated to social justice with games honoring the Black Lives Matter movement." It did not seem to be a relatively controversial or surprising message, considering how engaged WNBA players have been in the movement, which has also drawn support from a wide range of corporations and even the most controversy-averse sports leagues, like the NFL, since the killing of George Floyd in May. Yet the expression -- and the movement it supports -- bothered at least one WNBA owner, who also happens to be a sitting senator in the midst of a difficult campaign for her seat. Senator Kelly Loeffler, Republican of Georgia, is a co-owner of the Atlanta Dream and has been vocally criticizing the Black Lives Matter movement and the league's embrace of it. Loeffler is now facing widespread denunciations from players. WNBA Commissioner Cathy Engelbert released a statement distancing the league from Loeffler. Now, the WNBA is grappling with questions about whether an owner who appears to be fundamentally opposed to the league's stated values can remain in her position.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/09/sports/basketball/kelly-loeffler-atlanta-dream-protests.html?searchResultPosition=1


Eagles' Receiver Apologizes for Anti-Semitic Tweets

The star wide receiver DeSean Jackson apologized for sharing an anti-Semitic quotation attributed to Hitler, after that and other social media posts were widely condemned, including by his team. In the series of posts made on Instagram, Jackson also praised Louis Farrakhan, a minister notorious for his history of anti-Semitic comments. Jackson's team, the Philadelphia Eagles, condemned the posts in a statement, calling them "offensive, harmful and absolutely appalling." "They have no place in our society, and are not condoned or supported in any way by the organization," the team said. "We reiterated to DeSean the importance of not only apologizing but also using his platform to take action to promote unity, equality and respect." It's unclear whether Jackson would be disciplined for his posts. The team said that it was "continuing to evaluate the circumstances" in weighing action.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/us/desean-jackson-hitler-quotes.html?searchResultPosition=1


Positive Banned Substance Tests for Two Racehorses

Two undefeated horses trained by the Hall of Famer Bob Baffert tested positive for a banned substance in Arkansas, a person familiar with the results of the split-sample test said. One of the horses, Charlatan, won a division of the Arkansas Derby on May 2nd. The other, a filly named Gamine, won the Acorn Stakes at Belmont Park in New York on June 20th by nearly 19 lengths in a stakes-record time of 1:32.55, a performance that inspired talk of the filly taking on the Kentucky Derby, which is scheduled for September 5th. The horses had two samples test positive for lidocaine, a local numbing agent, according to the person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the case had not been fully adjudicated. The New York Times reported on the positive tests of their first samples in late May. The anesthetic is considered a Class 2 drug by the Association of Racing Commissioners International, and use of it carries a penalty of a 15- to 60-day suspension and a fine of $500 to $1,000 for a first offense. In the absence of mitigating circumstances, the horse would also be disqualified and forfeit its purse. Baffert, who had exercised his right to have a second test performed, planned to dispute the findings and argue that the positive tests were a result of environmental contamination by one of his employees.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/06/sports/horse-racing/baffert-drug-test-charlatan-gamine.html?searchResultPosition=1


Tennis Tours Hope to Salvage Their Seasons, but It is Not Looking Good

The path continues to get bumpier for the professional tennis tours as they attempt to salvage seasons disrupted by the coronavirus pandemic. For now, both the ATP Tour and the WTA are set to resume play in August: the men in Washington, D.C.; the women in Palermo, Italy. For now, the European Union would deny entry to travelers from certain countries, including the United States and Russia. It is unclear whether athletes will be exempt, and there are still concerns about the possibility of mandatory quarantines. The Associated Press also reported that China's General Administration of Sport said that the country would not host any international sports events for the remainder of 2020.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/09/sports/tennis-tournaments-china.html?searchResultPosition=1


Slurs Are Off the Table

The fight against systemic racism has taken aim at Scrabble. An agreement is at hand to bar offensive terms, though some players endorse using them for points. Several members of the North American Scrabble Players Association have called on the organization to ban the use of an anti-Black racial slur, and as many as 225 other offensive terms, from its lexicon. Hasbro, which owns the rights to Scrabble in North America, said that the players association had "agreed to remove all slurs from their word list for Scrabble tournament play, which is managed solely by NASPA and available only to members." Julie Duffy, a spokeswoman for Hasbro, also said the company will amend Scrabble's official rules "to make clear that slurs are not permissible in any form of the game."

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/sports/scrabble-racial-slurs-tournaments.html?searchResultPosition=1


Track Stars to Race on Separate Tracks

Call it extreme social distancing. Twenty-eight athletes will compete in eight disciplines at seven different tracks in Europe and the United States. Some of the events are seldom-contested distances -- including the 300-meter hurdles, 100 yards, and 3x100 meter relay -- chosen to take the pressure off athletes who might be far from their top form in their usual events. Using satellites and synchronizing technology, organizers will start each of the three participants simultaneously with digitally controlled starting guns. Races will be broadcast with a two-minute delay to account for the lag in transmission to the broadcast center in Zurich, which will synchronize the television images from all three venues and use a triple split screen.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/09/sports/six-feet-try-seven-separate-tracks.html?searchResultPosition=1


The Gaming World Loses Its Mind After Livestream

When Tyler Blevins, who is better known in the video gaming world as Ninja, posted a cryptic tweet that seemed to hint at some sort of announcement, his ardent fans thought he might reveal the kind of big-dollar contract one would expect from baseball or basketball stars. Instead, Blevins, who was left without an online home when the streaming platform Mixer announced in June that it would shut down, played video games live on YouTube and promised fans that more streams were coming "sooner rather than later." That Blevins could generate a flurry of speculation with one tweet speaks to the influence of one of the world's most famous online personalities and to the increasing popularity of high-profile gamers. Blevins has said in interviews he would like to be as well-known as the basketball star LeBron James.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/technology/ninja-fortnite-youtube.html?searchResultPosition=1


London Police Apologize for Handcuffing Two Black Athletes

The head of the London Metropolitan Police said that the force's handcuffing practices would be reviewed, after officers pulled a top British sprinter and her partner from their car and handcuffed them in front of their 3-month-old son. The athlete, Bianca Williams, 26, a European and Commonwealth games gold medalist, and her partner, Ricardo dos Santos, 25, a Portuguese track star, were driving home from training in Maida Vale, a well-off neighborhood in West London, when they were stopped by the police. They were handcuffed for 45 minutes on the side of the road while the police searched the vehicle. The London Metropolitan Police said in a statement that the vehicle was stopped because it was "being driven in a manner that raised suspicion," but Williams accused the officers of racial profiling. She said that she and dos Santos were pulled over only because they were Black and driving an expensive Mercedes in a wealthy section of the city. The police have apologized to Williams and dos Santos for causing distress but have denied wrongdoing, despite criticism that the encounter was the latest example of "stop and search" tactics disproportionately targeting Black people in Britain.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/08/world/europe/bianca-williams-police.html?searchResultPosition=1


South Korean Triathlete's Suicide Exposes Team's Culture of Abuse

Just after midnight on June 26th, Choi Suk-hyeon, a promising South Korean triathlete, sent two text messages. The first, to a teammate, asked for help looking after her pet dog. The other, to her mother, was more ominous. In that message Choi, 22, told her mother how much she loved her, before adding: "Mom, please make the world know the crimes they have committed." To her parents and former teammates, it was clear who she meant by "they." After Choi committed suicide, her family released a spiral-bound diary and secret recordings in which the young triathlete documented years of physical and psychological abuse she said she suffered at the hands of her team's coach, doctor, and two senior teammates. In one recording, the team's doctor, Ahn Ju-hyeon, can be heard repeatedly hitting her. "Lock your jaws! Come here!" Ahn is heard saying in the March 2019 recording, followed by a series of thudding strikes. The diaries and recordings, which were reviewed by The New York Times, have set off a firestorm of criticism and national soul searching about the corruption and abuse that has long pervaded the country's sports community.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/09/world/asia/korea-triathlete-suicide.html?searchResultPosition=2


MEDIA/TECHNOLOGY

Facebook Stumbles in Meeting With Ad Organizers

Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's two top executives, met with civil rights groups on Tuesday in an attempt to mollify them over how the social network treats hate speech on its site. But Mr. Zuckerberg, Facebook's chief executive, and Ms. Sandberg, the chief operating office