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Week In Review

Updated: Jun 21, 2023

Leah Gaydos

Edited be Elissa D. Hecker


Entertainment Fetty Wap Is Sentenced to 6 Years in Prison for Running Drugs

Fetty Wap, a well-known rapper, has been sentenced to six years in prison for his involvement in running a drug trafficking operation. The sentencing comes after Fetty Wap pleaded guilty to charges of distributing heroin and fentanyl. The court found that he played a significant role in the drug distribution network and imposed a lengthy prison term as a consequence.


Berlin Police Investigate Roger Waters After He Wore Nazi-Style Costumes at Concerts

Roger Waters, a former member of the band Pink Floyd, is under investigation by the Berlin police for wearing Nazi-style costumes during his concerts. The investigation was initiated after a number of individuals filed complaints against Waters, accusing him of using symbols associated with the Nazi regime. While Waters defended his actions as a form of artistic expression, authorities are examining whether his behavior violated German laws prohibiting the use of Nazi symbols.


Cultural Crackdown in China Shuts Comedy and Music Shows

China has implemented a significant cultural crackdown, resulting in the closure and cancellation of comedy and music shows across the country. The Chinese government has imposed strict regulations and restrictions on entertainment, aiming to exert control over artistic expression and maintain ideological conformity. These measures have led to the cancellation of popular shows and the limited availability of diverse cultural content, raising concerns about the shrinking space for creativity and freedom of expression in China.


Arts

How America’s Playwrights Saved the Tony Awards

The Tony Awards, a prestigious event in the theater industry, were at risk of cancellation due to the Writers Guild of America (WGA) strike. However, the efforts of America's playwrights played a crucial role in ensuring that the awards ceremony would go on. Playwrights stepped in to write and present original monologues, allowing the show to continue, despite the strike.


Should Making It in Fashion Be This Hard?

The fashion industry can be incredibly challenging for aspiring designers, as highlighted by the experiences of Elena Velez, a talented designer trying to establish her career. Velez's journey reflects the barriers and obstacles faced by many emerging designers, including financial constraints, intense competition, and a lack of support systems. The article explores the difficulties and realities of breaking into the fashion industry and raises questions about the need for systemic changes to create a more inclusive and accessible environment.


Sports

The E-Sports World Is Starting to Teeter

The e-sports industry, which encompasses competitive video gaming, is facing challenges as it begins to teeter. Despite its rapid growth and increasing popularity, the article highlights concerns over the industry's financial sustainability. While revenue has been rising steadily, there are indications of potential cracks in the business model, including high costs, limited profitability, and reliance on a small number of successful games. Additionally, the article explores the struggles faced by e-sports teams, players, and event organizers to secure long-term financial stability. The e-sports world is at a crucial juncture, and stakeholders are grappling with finding sustainable strategies to navigate the evolving landscape.


Technology/Media

Surgeon General Warns That Social Media May Harm Children and Adolescents

The Surgeon General has issued a warning about the potential harm social media can cause to the mental health of children and adolescents. The article discusses the negative effects of excessive social media use, including increased rates of anxiety, depression, and cyberbullying. It calls for greater awareness and responsible use of social media platforms to protect the well-being of young individuals.


Trump Justice Dept. Seized CNN Reporter’s Email and Phone Records

During the Trump administration, the Justice Department obtained the email and phone records of CNN reporter Barbara Starr. The article highlights concerns over press freedom and the use of government power to gain access to journalists' communications. It raises questions about the protection of journalists' sources and the potential infringement on First Amendment rights.


E. Jean Carroll Seeks New Damages From Trump for Comments on CNN

E. Jean Carroll, who accused Donald Trump of rape, is seeking additional damages from him for defamatory comments he made during a CNN interview. The article discusses Carroll's defamation lawsuit and the legal battle surrounding her allegations against Trump. It highlights the potential consequences for public figures who make false statements about others.


TikTok Sues Montana, Calling State Ban Unconstitutional

TikTok has filed a lawsuit against the state of Montana, arguing that its ban on the social media platform is unconstitutional. The article explains the legal dispute and TikTok's claim that the ban violates free speech rights. It sheds light on the ongoing tensions between TikTok and various U.S. states regarding data privacy and national security concerns.


Here’s What Happens When Your Lawyer Uses ChatGPT

The article discusses the use of ChatGPT in the legal profession, focusing on a specific case involving Avianca Airlines. It explores the implications and impact of integrating artificial intelligence into legal research and document preparation, shedding light on how it can affect various aspects of the legal practice, including client representation and the overall legal processes.


Emails, Chat Logs, Code and a Notebook: The Mountain of FTX Evidence

The article discusses the extensive evidence presented in the FTX case, involving cryptocurrency exchange founder Sam Bankman-Fried. It describes the various forms of evidence, including emails, chat logs, code, and a notebook, that shed light on the company's operations. The evidence plays a crucial role in legal proceedings and highlights the complexities of digital investigations.


A.I.’s Threat to Jobs Prompts Question of Who Protects Workers

The increasing presence of artificial intelligence (A.I.) in various industries raises concerns about job security and the need for worker protection. Discussions focus on the responsibility of governments, employers, and policymakers to safeguard workers' rights and livelihoods in the face of A.I. advancements.

A Russian court has ordered the jailing of American journalist Evan Gershkovich until August. The article highlights Gershkovich's detention and the broader crackdown on press freedom in Russia. It raises concerns about the treatment of journalists and the stifling of independent reporting in the country.


Driver’s Licenses, Addresses, Photos: Inside How TikTok Shares User Data

Delving into TikTok's data-sharing practices, the article sheds light on the personal information it collects, including driver's licenses, addresses, and photos. Privacy concerns are raised, emphasizing the importance of transparency and user control over their data within social media platforms like TikTok.


A.I. Needs an International Watchdog, ChatGPT Creators Say

The creators of ChatGPT advocate for an international watchdog to regulate A.I. technologies. Their proposal emphasizes the need for guidelines and oversight to address potential ethical implications and misuse of A.I., promoting responsible practices in its development and deployment.


Meta Fined $1.3 Billion for Violating E.U. Data Privacy Rules

Meta (formerly Facebook) has been fined $1.3 billion by the European Union for violating data privacy rules. The article discusses the fine and the E.U.'s concerns about Meta's handling of user data. It reflects the growing scrutiny faced by tech giants regarding data privacy and their compliance with regulations.


General News

States Are Not Entitled to Windfalls in Tax Disputes, Supreme Court Rules

The Supreme Court has ruled that states are not entitled to windfalls in tax disputes. This decision limits the ability of states to collect excessive taxes and sets a precedent for the distribution of tax revenues in cases where there is a dispute between the states and individuals or businesses.


Supreme Court Limits EPA’s Power to Address Water Pollution

The Supreme Court has placed limits on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) power to address water pollution. This ruling raises concerns about the ability of the EPA to regulate and enforce clean water standards and may have implications for environmental protection efforts across the country.


White House and G.O.P. Strike Debt Limit Deal to Avert Default

The White House and the GOP have reached a deal on the debt limit to avert a default, providing temporary relief and avoiding a potential economic crisis. This article discusses the agreement and the implications for the country's financial stability.


Oath Keepers Leader Is Sentenced to 18 Years in Jan. 6 Sedition Case

Stewart Rhodes, the leader of the Oath Keepers, has received an 18-year prison sentence in connection with his involvement in the January 6th Capitol insurrection. This case represents a significant legal outcome as authorities hold those responsible for their actions during the violent attack on the US Capitol.


Trump Criminal Trial Scheduled for March 2024

Former President Donald Trump's criminal trial date has been set for March 2024, marking a significant development in ongoing legal proceedings against him.


Justice Dept. Investigated Clinton Foundation Until Trump’s Final Days

The Department of Justice investigated the Clinton Foundation until the final days of the Trump administration. The probe focused on potential irregularities related to the foundation's charitable activities, adding to the scrutiny that has surrounded the organization for several years.


Prosecutors Sought Records on Trump’s Foreign Business Deals Since 2017

Prosecutors have been actively seeking records of former President Trump's foreign business deals since 2017. These efforts are part of ongoing investigations into possible financial improprieties and aim to shed light on Trump's business activities and potential conflicts of interest during his presidency.

https://www.nytimes.com/2023/05/22/us/politics/trump-records-foreign-deals.html?searchResultPosition=1 Hundreds of Thousands Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Since Pandemic Protections Expired

Since pandemic-related protections expired, hundreds of thousands of people have lost their Medicaid coverage. This loss of coverage raises concerns about the accessibility of healthcare for vulnerable populations and highlights the ongoing struggles faced by individuals and families in the wake of the pandemic.


Brands Embracing Pride Month Confront a Volatile Political Climate

Brands embracing Pride Month are navigating a volatile political climate, as some face backlash and criticism for their support of LGBTQ+ rights. This article highlights the challenges companies face in balancing their commitment to inclusivity with potential repercussions in a divided society.


Harlan Crow Declines to Provide Information Sought by Senate Democrats

Harlan Crow, a Texas businessman linked to Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, has refused to provide information sought by Senate Democrats. The Senate Judiciary Committee requested this information as part of its inquiry into potential conflicts of interest, raising questions about transparency and accountability within the judiciary system.


With Climate Panel as a Beacon, Global Group Takes On Misinformation

A global group of experts forms a climate panel to combat misinformation related to climate change. Their collective efforts aim to provide accurate information and counter misleading narratives, highlighting the significance of evidence-based knowledge for shaping climate policies and public understanding.


Bill to Force Texas Public Schools to Display Ten Commandments Fails

A bill that aimed to mandate the display of the Ten Commandments in Texas public schools has failed. The failure of this bill highlights the ongoing debate surrounding the separation of church and state and underscores the challenges in implementing religious displays in public institutions.


Texas House Votes to Impeach Attorney General Ken Paxton: What to Know

The Texas House has voted to impeach Attorney General Ken Paxton, setting the stage for a potential removal from office. This article provides an overview of the background and key details surrounding the impeachment process and its implications for the state's political landscape.


Ken Paxton Is Temporarily Suspended After Texas House Vote

After being impeached by the Texas House, Ken Paxton, the state's Attorney General, has been temporarily suspended from his position. This development follows a series of controversies surrounding Paxton and raises questions about the future of his role in Texas politics.


Ban on Weight Discrimination Becomes Law in New York

New York City has passed a law banning weight discrimination, marking an important step in protecting individuals from weight-based prejudice and promoting inclusivity. The law aims to address weight bias in various settings, including employment, housing, and public accommodations.


Nashville Parents Can Have Say in Case Over Shooter’s Writings, Judge Rules

A judge has ruled that parents in Nashville can have a say in the case involving a shooter's writings at the Covenant School. This decision allows parents to provide input on the handling of the incident and raises important questions about the responsibility and accountability of schools in such cases.


How a ‘Blue Wall’ Inside N.Y. State Prisons Protects Abusive Guards

An investigation reveals the existence of a "Blue Wall" within New York state prisons, which protects abusive guards from facing consequences for their actions. This article sheds light on the culture of misconduct and cover-ups within the prison system and the challenges faced in holding accountable those responsible for inmate abuse.


Steve Bannon’s Criminal Trial Is Scheduled for Next May

Steve Bannon's criminal trial has been scheduled for May 2024. The trial will address the charges against Bannon, a former adviser to Donald Trump, and will be closely watched as it unfolds in the legal and political landscape.

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